Skip to main content

Full text of "Korea Mission Field - The Korea Mission Field, June 1916 (v.12, no.6)"

See other formats


Vol. XII 



JUNE, 1916 



No. 6 



I* 



in i S) 0 Afl-b^A+sffeB? 

THE KOREA 

MISSION FIELD 







BISHOP HARRIS. 



fs SEOUL 



KOREA 





THE KOREA MISSION FIELD 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE. 

PUBLISHED AT SEOUL in the interest of all the Evangelical Missions in Korea. 

EDITOR. — Rev. Allen F, DeCamp. 

BUSINESS MANAGER. — Mr. Gerald Bonwick, the Tract House, Seoul. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION, including postage to any part of the world, one or 50 cent, 
gold, or 2/1 English Currency. Business matters and Subscriptions should be addressed 
to Mr. Bonwick as above. Remittances from countries other than Korea and Japan 
should always be sent by Foreign Money Order or ordinary Bank cheque. Please do 
not send stamps or Inland Money Coders. 

If preferred. Subscriptions may also be sent to any of the following: — 

In America. 

Dr. F. M. North, 150 Fifth Ave., New York. Rev. J. E. McCulloch, 422 Park Ave, 
Nashville, Tenn. Mr. U. H. Day, 156 Fifth Ave. New York. Rev. Ernest Hall 
920 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal. 

In Great Britain. 

Mrs. S. Bonwick, 28 Weston Park, Crouch End, London, England. 

SINGLE COPIES 10 sen; three of same issue for 25 sen. 

PRINTED by Fukuin Printing Co. Ltd., Kobe, Japan. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial Pages 

The Union of Presbyterians and One General Assembly in Korea 



Rev. Engine Bell. 

Bishop Harris Rev. F. Herron Smith. 

How I Became a Missionary Mrs. C. S. Denting. 

When I Get to America John J. Johns. 

The Work of One Afternoon Mrs. J. R. Moose. 

The Spiritual Life in Itinerating Rev. Victor H. Wachs. 



Dedication and Installation at Korean Central Y.M.C.A 

Secretary Rev. F. M. Brockman. 

Itinerating Accessories. 

HI. The Donkey 

Things Korean. 

I. Genesis of the Korean People 

II. Two Bible Women setting the Pace 

III. Korean Lepears “ Going One Better ” 

IV. “ A Little child shall lead them ” 

A Presbyterian Evangelist. 



V. The Women Leper Joy-Givers Rev. J. C. Crane. 

VI. Folklore,— The Crying Seed Korea Rennav. 

The Kunsan Men’s Bible Institute Rci'. IV. B. Harrison. 

Correspondence R(^- V,- ^V. Koons. 

Notes and Personals 



147 

151 

152 
154 
156 

159 

160 

162 

163 

165 

165 

165 

166 

166 

167 

167 

168 
170 



©HE I^OP^BA ffliSSION FIELD 



VOL. XII. JUNE, 1916. NO. 6. 



EDITORIAL PAGES. 

VVe are glad to present in this issue the article by Eugene Bell 
describing “ The Union of Presbyterians and One General Assembly in 
Korea.” The most hopeful feature of this development will be seen to 
have been its vital growth, — 

“ Silently as the Springtime her crown of verdure weaves, 

And all the trees on all the hills put forth their thousand leaves.” 

This also is the prophesy of its persistence and waxing strength. 
The closing notes of this article which suggest enlarged Church Union 
which shall embrace all the evangelical Missions in Korea, are notes 
accordant with the bells of Heaven. The writer declares the only pos- 
sible excuse for not having such union to be a lack of unity. But if this 
unity is lacking, is not such lack a grievious sin, and if so, who is the 
sinner ? Is it the Methodist, the Anglican or the Presbyterian ; or are 
they all under condemnation ? Is someone waiting to be wooed by 
another to that other, — the Methodist by and to the Presbyterian or vice 
versa ? What a vain and shortsighted conception ! Truly, “ My 
thoughts are not as your thoughts, neither are my ways your ways, saith 
the Lord, for as the heavens are higher than the earth so are my ways 
higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts,” for the 
Holy Spirit has long been wooing each to the Christ “ Whose head is 
wet with dew and his locks with the drops of the night,” as he waits out- 
side for a response to His repeated knocking. If only we will hearken, 
open and come close to Him we then must come as close to one another 
as possible (His possible) which is as close as the members of our living 
body are to each other. Yes, even closer still than that, “ As Thou 
Father art in Me and I in Thee that they also may be one in us, that the 
world may believe that Thou has sent Me.” 

“ Oh for a man to arise in me. 

That the man that is might cease to be ! ” 

Suppose we change this a bit and say. 

Oh for a Christ to arise in me. 

That the Christ that is might cease to be ! 

A Christ who through me “ might set free in the world the power of 
I God.” When at the tomb of I^azarus Jesus cried ” Come forth ! ” he 

j that had been dead began to breathe, perhaps to struggle and tumble 

about in the effort to get loose from grave bonds. Then the Savior said. 



148 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



“ Loose him and let him go ! So our Christ to-day is alive. We feel it 
to be true. We are almost sure that Easter is more than a history or a 
hope. We do feel confident that there is in it a Christ Who, though 
far away, is nevertheless alive ! But tell me, is not the Christ 
of to-day, tho alive, nevertheless bound about with grave bonds ? Why 
not loose Him and let Him go " and so “ set free in the world the power 
of God,” the power that raised Jesus from the dead? Quit being Chris- 
tians so like the world as to be intelligible and measurable by the world 
and so despicable in its eyes ! A true Christian has been well defined as 
“ A unique individual. He is a supernatural being. He is inexplicable ! 
If he could be explained he would not be a Christian.” Spirits in this 
mundane sphere need bodies through which to work. For the home of 
the Eternal Spirit of Christ, has been appointed the Church, For His 
body’s sake which is the Church ” “ that the world may know that Thou 
hast sent Me.” 

The Church Militant, — Old Testament Christians. 

VIII. 

Christians may be divided into three classes the nominal, the New 
Testament and the Old Testament Christian. The nominal Christian is 
one who happens to be a citizen of a so-called Christian country, which 
citizenship, so far from releasing him from thralldom to “ the world, the 
flesh and the Devil ” may accentuate it, by opening to him manifold 
doors of opportunity, through equipment with the munitions of civilization, 
which make possible his becoming fourfold more wicked than otherwise 
were possible ! The New Testament Christian is he who has been “ born 
from above ” by ‘Hhe washing of regeneration and the renewing of the 
Holy Ghost,” whereby he views the world of men and of things from 
the standpoint of Jesus, the Christ, Whom he joyfully accepts as his Savior 
and King. An Old Testament Christian, like a child, is immature and 
undeveloped ; he deals with shadows and symbols ; the promises he 
greets from afar as prophetic of peace, good-will and brotherhood totally 
unsuited to this present world in which he now dwells, but possibly to be 
realized in a “ sweet by and by.” In a word. The Old Testament Chris- 
tian to-day is like those Jews who rejected Christ because He proclaimed 
a kingdom consisting “ not of meat and drink but of righteousness and 
true holiness,” whose nobles consist of those who are last of all because 
servants of all and so likest the Clirist Who was among men, preeminent- 
ly, as one who served ! 

The most shocking feature of the gigantic war now waging is that a 
majority of the twelve millions of men who confront each other on the 
battle-lines of I^'urope have been baptized into the blessed name of the 
Prince of Peace and so were pledged to love all Christians well enough, 
mutually, to die for one another, in the stead of which they have closed 
in a death grapple for mutual destruction. Not only so but each claims 
God’s assistance against the other on the ground that he is instinctively 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



149 



defending himself against the murderous machinations of his fellow Chris- 
tian ! This “ confusion worse confounded " seems explicable ; on the 
basis that the present day warriors of Europe, if Christians at all, are 
Old Testament Christians. 

Theirs is the Old Testament ^ conception of God. The Lord of 
Hosts, a God of war who ordereth the battle and fights upon the side of 
His chosen people against all other nations and giveth them the victory, 
too, so long as they obey his orders. This is the crude, dim, alphabetical 
conception of God of the most ancient part of the Old Testament, which 
matured and ripened through the centuries until God Himself became 
incarnate in “ His Son by whom also He made the worlds," and who 
was called “The Word of God." Christ declared that God is “Our 
Father," that God is Love, and added, “ He that hath seen Me hath 
seen the Father." Hence any conception of God which is different from 
Christ and from His teaching is unwarranted by Scripture. The Euro- 
pean contestants, we are told, do not pray to “ Our Father " God nor to 
the Lord Jesus Christ, and in this they are perfectly consistent. 

We are told that our society, business, politics and our civilization 
need to be Christianized, which is indeed true, but these things can be 
accomplished only as our religion is Christianized. Then all things will 
be made new including God and country ; for the Old Testament concep- 
tion of God will be replaced by Christ’s conception, “ Our Father," and 
instead of being national patriots we will become international, as was the 
Christ, and thus war will cease and permanent peace will be ushered in. 
Dr. John Henry Jowett, of New York, but lately of England, writes so 
strongly and luminously on these points that we quote him gladly. 
“ First we must Christianize our conception of God. * He that hath seen 
Me hath seen the Father.’ Our conception of God must begin and end in 
Christ our Lord. Our conception must not be B C. or A.D. but C. 
What shall we think about God? Just what Jesus Christ reveals. Late- 
ly we have been using the word “ God " without its Christian content. 
We have been going back to the Old Testament for our conception of 

God, and even back to the early records of the Old Testament back 

to the twilight of revelation, back to the God revealed in the world’s 
childhood before the fuller word had yet been spoken. 

We have been opprest by the way the name of God has been used 
in the course of the present war. But what has been the value of the 
name ? By no chance have I seen Him called “ the Father " in the 
invocations of kings or Kaiser. By no chance have I seen him addrest 
as Christ. No, it is the name of “ God ’’ robbed and emptied of its 
Christ significance. It is God, minus Christ. 

The Old Testament is the wonderful record of the slow education of 
a particular people. The revelation begins in the dawn, in the mist and 
dull haze of passing night, and the day brightens and broadens until the 
full sun rises in Christ our Lord. Here is one of the things of the early 
twilight. “ Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, foot for foot burning for burning, 
wound for wound, stripe for stripe." That is where we are to-day ; but 
that is not one of the things revealed to us in Christ. Listen to our 



THL KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



150 

Lord : “ But I say unto you, love your enemies.” We have gone back 

to the twilight for standards for the noon. , 

This is one of the most deadly practical heresies of our time. We 
have un-Christianized the name of God, and the first and paramount neces- 
sity, if we are ever to establish a lasting peace, is to restore that name to 
its Christian value. When we use the word “ God ” it must be Jesus 
whom we see. “ He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father.” We shall 
never have pe^ce until the God we worship, and to whom we offer our 
prayer, is the Lord and Father of us all, revealed to us in the word and 
life and death of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. 

Another conception which needs to be Christianized, if an abiding 
peace is to make her home among the children of men, is our conception of 
nationality. Here again we can choose to live in the dim, hazy twilight, 
or in the fuller noon. We can choose to live in the early Old 'Testament 
with Moses and Joshua, or in the New Testament with Jesus Christ. We 
can do our thinking about nationality among the primitive standards, or 
we can go into the high school of Christ. 

Now where shall we get our thought moulds of race and nationality? 
Shall we get them from Samson or from Christ ? It is my deep convic- 
tion that much of our evil practises have arisen from our un-Christian 
thinking about these things. We have wiped out the Christian revelations 
and standards. We have ignored Christ, and we pursue our thinking as 
tho He had never been. The consequence is, our conception of nation- 
ality is too often tribal and exclusive. That is Old Testament thinking. 
It is not the Christianized thought of the New. 

Turn to the Christian revelation. 

“ Ye are all the children of God by faith in Jesus Christ.* * * 

There is neither Jew nor Greek.” 

“ There is no difference between the Jew and the Greek, for the same 
Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.” 

“ Where there is neither Greek nor Jew, Barbarian nor Scythian.” 
How vast is the contrast between this conception and the one which 
I have just named ! But does the Christ-conception wipe out the element 
of nationality and disregard it ? By no means. It disregards nationality 
as an ultimate, it honors nationality as a mediate ; it magnifies nationality 
as a means ; it rejects nationality as an end. Christianity conceives 
national differences as the intended ministers of a richer union. Nation- 
ality is not an orchestra, it is only an instrument. Nationality is not a 
complete picture, it is only a tint in the making of a picture. In Christian 
teaching, endowments are specialized for the sake of a larger and general 
service. The nation is the servant of the race.” 



THE KOREA MISS 10 IS FIELD. 



5 * 



THE UNION OF PRESBYTERIANS AND ONE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN KOREA. 

There are now, and have been for years, four Presbyterian Missions 
at work in Korea. They are the Australian, Canadian, and Northern, 
and Southern of the United States. 

From the time there were just two it was felt to be both necessary 
and desirable that they should be in the closest possible relation with each 
other. With this in view, as early as 1889 a Presbyterian Council was 
formed. To this Council was to be referred everything pertaining to the 
common interests of all the Presbyterian Missions, especially whatever 
concerned the organization of but one Presbyterian church in Korea. 
This Council has continued up to the present time, and tho it has only 
advisory powers, there has never yet arrived a time when its advice and 
decisions have been ignored by any of the bodies composing its member- 
ship. 

At first it had to do with the locationTn different parts of the country 
of the various Presbyterian Missions as they arrived and began work. 
The Northern Presbyterians were already established in Seoul, Pyeng 
Yang and the northwestern part of the country. On the recommenda- 
tion of this Council, the Australians took the southeast ; the Southern 
Presbyterians took the southwest and the Canadians took the northeast. 

With reference to church government, each Mission or missionary 
might have claimed the powers of foreign evangelists with authority to 
examine candidates, baptize, and administer discipline. But all these 
powers were voluntarily surrendered to the central body. This Council, 
in the days when there were no native elders to sit with them, appointed 
committees for different sections of the country, consisting of three or 
more of their own number, clothed with sessional powers to examine 
applicants for church membership, administer discipline and organize 
churches. These were called sessional committees. The central body 
being the full session or Presbytery. This body from the year 1901 ^ 
organized and conducted a Union Theological Seminary at Preng Yang. 
Later when there were a number of elders and seven graduates from the 
five year Seminary course were ordained to the Gospel ministry, one 
native Presbytery was organized for the whole country. The respective 
church authorities in the home lands having given their consent, the or- 
dained missionaries became full members of this native church court 
while retaining their membership in the Presbyteries at home. As had 
been done in the Council, Commissions of Presbytery were appointed for 
different parts of the country, and clothed with Presbyterial authority 
ad hiterim. When the Central Presbytery grew to be very large, it was 
organized into one General Assembly for the whole country and the 
Commissions of Presbytery were organized into seven Presbyteries, that 
continue till to-day. 

No Mission or missionary acts independently but gets all his authori- 
ty from these native church courts. His records of examinations, disci- 



*52 



THE KOREA MISRIOK FIELD. 



pline, and ordination of elders and deacons must all Be submitted to Pres* 
bytery and from any of his decisions appeal can be taken to the higher 
church courts in the regular way. From the organization of the first 
Presbytery the native brethren have always been in the majority. It is 
cause for the greatest thanksgiving that, under the blessing of God, the 
church has been organized in unity and harmony without friction. In 
the Council a divided vote has never been along Mission lines. In the 
native courts a divided vote has never been along racial lines. A spirit 
of harmony and unity has prevailed throughout. The Korean brethren 
have deferred to their fathers in the faith in the most beautiful spirit. F*or 
the first three years, they insisted on having a foreign missionary for 
moderator of the General Assembly. And finally, it was only after a 
missionary declined the election, that they could be induced to put in one of 
their own number. This too in spite of the fact that he was well qualified 
and made an excellent presiding officer. There has never been friction 
between one Mission and another. There has never been friction between 
the native and foreign brethren, and we praise God for one united har- 
monious Presbyterian church for all of Korea, with one General Assem- 
bly having 132 ordained native ministers, with 224 organized, and 1850 
unorganized churches ; 332 elders with a total baptized membership of 
61370. Associated with these are 93 ordained foreign missionaries of 
the four Missions named above. 

We are organized on the fundamental and historic doctrines of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed faith. We believe in union most heartily. 
It would seem to be a crime to have done otherwise than has been done 
in Korea in having just one Presbyterian Church for the whole country. 
We are in hearty sympathy with and an advocate of Union, and would 
most heartily unite even with other Protestant Evangelical churches if the 
way were opened. We rejoice in the union we have. We will support 
it without reserve. But there can be no organic union where there is not 
unity first. The sin of Schism is needless and sinful separation from Chris- 
tian brethren of true faith and unquestioned piety. But if it ever comes to 
the time in Korea when any church court will do as some church courts 
have done at home, and insist on ordaining to the ministry men who 
question the divinity of Christ, the Virgin Birth, Vicarious atonement and 
the resurrection, there will be division and there should be division. 

Eugrnf Be[.l. 



BISHOP HARRIS.. 

The other day Brother Morris remarked that Bishop Harris must 
stand as the representative of Christianity to a great many Japanese, 
especially those in high positions. I replied that in my judgment, no 
man living, either Japanese or foreigner, represented Jesus Christ to a 
greater number of influential Japanese, than Bishop Harris. They know 
him and love him for the noble Christian gentleman that he is. 

As he had announced some time ago that he expects to resign his 



THE ‘KOREA MISSION FIEhD. 



169 



makes them most vivid. I do not remember a better village scene than 
the one called “ Colportage and Cooperage " on page 16. 

' The report of colportage on the 6nal pages ought to be carefully 
looked over by every missionary. When 33 men in various parts of the 
country have each sold over 5,000 portions of the Bible in the past year, 
and one has passed the 8,000 mark, why are so many hanging around 
the 2,000 point ? That is a question that needs to be answered, and I 
know one col porter in my charge who will have to do some diligent 
explaining. 

The totals for the year are better in every way than ever before. 
809,000 portions sold means that one person in every 20 in the whole 
country received a copy of some part of the Bible. A few years of that 
will put God’s word into literally every house in this country. I wonder 
if that can be said to-day of some of our home countries ? I should hate 
to be asked the question. 

If space permitted, I could quote any number of striking incidents, 
but my purpose is to get people to read this excellent Report for them- 
selves, So I will pass on only this one sentence ; “ The one thing that 
struck me, a new-comer in Korea, was the well-thumbed appearance of 
the Bible in Christian homes.” To get the Bible into the hands of unbeliev- 
ers, who feel that if they are to get their money’s worth they must 
read the strange book they have just bought, and to supply Christian 
homes in all the far-off nooks of this mountainous land with the one book 
that they really care to read, this is a work that the angels might covet, 
and in which any servant of the Lord can be glad to have a share. 

Sincerely, 



E. U. Koons. 



170 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 

^ Mr. George A. Gregg, who left Seoul for furfo in America, early in January, has 
reported from 164 Cumberland St, Toronto, Canada, his native city, his safe arrival 
at that place. Mr. Gregg avers that he still remembers and loves his Seoul friends 
and trusts they will reciprocate, etc. However, he assured us that his further re- 
marks were not for publication. 



Mrs. W. E. Smith, of Pyeng Yang, and her two daughters, sailed from Yoko- 
hama for the United States on the 25th of March, especially for the benefit of the 
health of the elder of the children. The father, with the son, may follow later. 



Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Daniel and their six children, late of_Chunjii, established 
themselves as members of the missionary community of Seoul, early in April. Dr. 
Daniel has been appointed by his Mission, Pres. So. to serve for fifteen months on 
the staff of the Severance Hospital in Seoul, when they will take their regular furlo, 
after which it is hoped and expected that they will return to Seoul and that the 
connection with the hospital will become permanent. 



Dr. and Mrs. R. Grierson, during April, enjoyed a family reunion wdth their 
daughters during the Spring vacation of the School at Pyeng Yang, with which the 
girls are connected as pupils, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Miller, in Seoul, 
greatly to the pleasure, also, of the Seoul foreign community. 



Mr. Yun Chiho has been elected General Secretary of the Korean Y.M.C.A., 
Mr. F. M. Brockman, who has hitherto been discharging the duty now devolving on 
Mr. Yun, will become Honorary General Secretary. It is said to have been agreed 
between the Korean and Japanese Associations that they shall each appoint three 
honorary members on their boards of directors. 



The new building, including gymnasium, at the Y.M.C.A. has just been complet- 
ed and a special department for the boys inaugurated under the competent leader- 
ship of Mr. Barnhard, who has recently arrived from the United States and taken 
charge of the same, which arrangement which will largely contribute to the efficien- 
cy of the institution on all of which we felicitate the management. 

This new building was dedicated May 6th, 1916. 



Samuel Dunlop Crothers was born into the home of Rev. and Mrs. J. Y. 
Crothers, in Andong, April 15, 1916. 



The steamer on which Rev. C. N. Weems and family were booked to leave for 
furlo in the United States June 29th, struck a rock, and was disabled so that their 
departure will be delayed until July i8th. 



Rev. and Mrs. D. M. Lyall, of Masampo, recently left Korea for Australia, on 
regular furlo. 



Dr. and Mrs. Wm. M. Baird left Severance Hospital for their home in Pyeng 
Yang, in April. Mrs. Baird is reported as greatly improved in health. 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



NEW BOOKS. NEW EDITIONS. 

The KOREAN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY is pleased to be able to 
announce continued additions to its stock of Korean and Japanese religious 
publications. 

c^taio?uc the latest KOREAN PUBLICATIONS. 

Number. Price, 

389 A NEW COMBINED HYMNAL & NEW TESTAMENT being 

the No. 4 type Hymnal and No. 5 type Eunmun New Testament 
in one volume. Most attractive. Half-leather I.OO 

390 do. do. Full leather circuit I.60 

391 do. do. Best leather yapp 2.75 

181 “LIFE OF JOHN WESLEY” by Rev. Nehe- 

miah Curnock; trans. by Rev. J. R. Moose. 1st edition 12 

300 “THE SHORTER CATECHISM” trans. by Rev. 

J. S. Gale, D.D. Fourth edition 05 

251 “ THREE HUNDRED BIBLE STUDIES ” ^ 

by Kimn Chong Sang. The first edition sold out in less than a 
year. Second edition 30 

291 “THE ESSENTIALS OF CHRISTIANITY” by Rev. 

H. G. Sheldon, D.D. ; trans, by Rev. C. S. Deming, S.T.D. This 
book has been specially prepared by the author for Eastern 
readers. A most important book. 1st edition 30 

182 “EMINENT SAYINGS AND PROVERBS” by Kim 

Yi Kwan. Extracts from the Bible, Confucius, Mencius and 
Occidental proverbs. First edition 04 

292 “ NOTES ON EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY & THEOLOGY 

PROPER ” by Rev. W. D. Reynolds, D.D. 1st edition. .14 

293 “ TRUE RELIGION’S ONE SOURCE ” by Kim Byung 

Cho, Shows that God has not left the nations without evidence 
of His existence, and that He is the one source of the knowledge 
the Truth. Mixed Script. 1st edition 07 

STATIONERY & SUPPLIES 

FOR MIMEOGRAPH AND TYPEWRITER. 

Underwood type ribbons. Purple, black and bi-color each 2.00 

Carbon paper for duplicating. Purple and black per sheet .08 

Note-paper for typewriter. Foreign bond, quarto lOO sheets .65 

Extra thin paper for manifolding, quarto .100 sheets .30 

Japanese paper for use with mimeograph, or for copies of correspondence. 

Large quarto 1,000 sheets .80 

Foreign paper for use with mimeograph, etc. Quarto 100 sheets .15 



Mimeograph wax 


stencil paper 


for handwriting. 


No. 3 100 sheets 


75 


do. 


do. 


do. 


best quality... 100 sheets 


1.50 


do. 


do. 


do. 


No. 4 100 sheets 


1.00 


do. 


do. 


do. 


best quality... 100 sheets 


2.CO 


do. 


do. 


for typewriter. 


Per quire 


2.00 



Mimeographs, complete, with supplies. No. 3 size lO.OO 

do. do. No. 4 size 12.00 

Mimeograph Ink, Rollers, Stylus, etc. at various prices. 



KOREAN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY, 

GERALD BONWICK, General Secretary. CHCONG-NO, SEOUZ.. 



II 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD, 








the RU-BER'OID Mali' 



CONTRACTOR & BUILDER 
SEOUL. 

Telephone 2446. 



We carry a full stock of the folloiving 

Ru-ber-oid, Ka/oroid, and other products of the Standard Paint Co. 
Wilkinson, Heywood & Clark’s Varnishes* Stains, Paints, and 
SYNOLEO the new washable distemper. 

Sargent & Co.’s hardware, locks, butts, sliding hangers and build- 
ing sundries. 

Elmer Moody Co.’s high-grade mi I I- work. Oregon pine five-cross 
panel doors. _ 

^ Estimates furnished and correspondence solicited in English. 



Insure your Houses and Goods against loss by fire III 

THE NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE Go., LM. 

agjen’ts for chosen. 

L. RONDON & Co., Seoul. 

Travel and Tours in the Far East by Rail or Steamers, and to 
the principal Capitals of Europe in TWELVE DAYS by the 

GREAT TRANS-SIBERIAN 

Information and tickets supplied by 

L. RONDON & Co.. Seoul, Agents. 

Are you going to any point in America across the Pacific? We 
shall be pleased to give you any information and provide you with the 
necessary tickets. 

Agents for the 

TOYO KISBIN KAIStlA. 

L. RONDON & Co. 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. iii 

THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

CARRY A FULL STOCK OP 

\ 

Korean, Mixed Script, Chinese, Japanese and English Scriptures, 
and raised characters for the Blind. Scriptures in other languages 
supplied bn order. 

We are ready to furnish Scriptures to Missionaries for sale or can 
furnish money for the support of colporteurs and Bible women. 

SEND FOn ritICE LIST OR BETTER 

Call at the BIBLE HOUSE. 

Make this your headquarters while in Seoul. 

Y.IMI.C.A. BXJIX^DIM'O, Telegraphic Address: 

Clxon^ No. “ BIBLES” SEOUL. 



lEC.- IE^0^3'H>0 & Oo., 

COHL mERCH/INTS, 

S E O U L. 

Special Agents for South 31anehurian Hailtvay Co. 

(Coal Sales Dept.) 

Foriv milling Agents for Goods hy Land and Sea, 

^ 3Iining Supplies a Speciality. 

Special Terms to Missionaries, 

Telephone No. 835. !-chome, Gishudori, SEOUL. 

{OPPOSITE STANDARD OIL Co.) 

LADIES’ & GENTLEMEN’S 

TAILOR & GENERAL OUTFITTER. 

^ Just removed to larger A ^reat variety of Cioth 

INBW PREMISES in Stock to be 

) 

next to Chosen Motel. - sold by the yard. 

2 Chome, Hase^atVa Cho^ 
Telephone No. 97i; " SEOUL. 



iv 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD. 



Dr. DAVID E. HAHN, 

DENTAL SURGEON 



Office Hours : 

9-12 
■ 2 — 5 



SEOUL, KOREA. 

PMONB 2290, 



Please write or wire in advance for appointments. 



co. 

SEOUL BRANCH : 

HONBSACHI a CHOmS, SEOXJI.. 

(CHIN KOKAI.) 



GROCERS & GENERAL MERCHANTS. 



TELEPHONE Transfer Accotmt (Purikae Chokin) 

Nos. 212 and 1722. Keijo No. 44. 

Orders from the interior will be attended to promptly, special 
attention being paid to packing and safe delivery. 



THE DAMCHI GINKQ, LIB 

(FORMERLV' THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF JAPAN.) 
ESTABLISHED 1873. 



CAPITAL, Subscribed ... 
,, Paid Up 



RESERVE FUND 

DEPOSITS 






Yen 21,500,000 
„ 13,437,500 

„ 9,350,000 

„ 93,000,000 



HEAD OFFICE: TOKYO. 

SEOUL BRANCH : HONMACH! 2-CHOME. 

Tel. Noa 11, 611 & 2317. 



THE KOREA MISSION FIELD, 



V 



THE BANK OF CHOSEN. 

(FORMERLY THE BANK OF KOREA) 



Capital Paid up Yen 10,000,000 



GSO\ ERTVOR. 

K. SHODA, Esq. 

I>IR EOTOR JS. 

;R. MIZUKOSHI, Esq., T. MISHIMA, Esq., Y. KIMURA, Esq. 



HEAD OFFICE, SEOUL 

TELEPHONE Nos. 331, 332, 1260, 1261, 1613. 



BRANCHES: 

KOREAN BRANCHES 

Chemulpo, Pyongyang, Wonsan, Taiku, Fusan, Chinnampo 
Kunsan, lYlokpo, IVIasan, Shinwiju, Hoilyong, Ranam. 

MANCHURIAN BRANCHES 
Antung, IVIukden, Dairen, Chang-chun, 
Szu-ping-chieh, Kai-yuan. 

HOME BRANCHES 
Tokyo^ Osaka. 



Every description of general banking and exchange business 
transacted. 



Vi ~ TIW KOREA MlSSlOh FIELD. 

YE OLD CURIO SHOP 

directly opposite the main gate of the Chosen Hotel, 

SEOUL. 

W. W. TAYLOR, Proprietor. KIM SANG EURN, Manager. 



A complete line of Things Korean carried in stock. 



We are anxious to get into touch with Missionaries in the country 
who have charge of School 

INDUSTRIAL & SELF-HELP DEPTS. 

as well as with Koreans who have some special product to dispose of. 
We are trying to place 

KOREAN MANUFACTURES 

on the home markets and solicit your assistance and suggestions. 

Addre.^,s :—Ilase(fmva-c1io^ SBOTIL. Phone lo39. 



The Seoul Garage and Sales Co. 

(to Hasef/atva-cho, SEOUL. 

TEL. No. 2183. 

We carry in stock 28 X 3 Motor-cycle Tyres, Smith Motor Wheels 
All kinds of Repair work undertaken. 

Cars for rent night and day. 



UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER DEPT. 

We have been appointed Agents for Korea and carry 
a stock of No. 5 Rebuilts and New Machines, as well 
as accessories. 



GOMMISSIOIN DEPT. 

Eighteen years’ connection with this market places us in a position 
to offer our services to the public. If you want to sell or buy get in 
touch with us. Nothing too big or small. 

W. W. TAYLOR, Proprietor. 




I® (m'SS™ 1 3 1 i»#) allSS®^aiil»i=>^cV-f!t>-l-liia 



Vcl All. No. 0. 



• The Indispensable Ally of 'Missionary Societies 

IS 

THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN 
BIBLE SOCIETY, 

It provides the Scriptures in every great 
tongue of mankind, besides several hundred 
lesser languages and dialects of the world. 

Its organized channels of circulation ramify 
far and wide, li has experienced agents in 
fifty different States, and maintains depots in 
nearly a hundred of the chief cities of the earth. 

Its KOREA AGENCY provides Scriptures 
in all the languages spoken in the Empire and 
maintains a staff of 200 Bible-men and women. 
The Agency circulated 826,635 volumes of the 
Holy Scriptures in 1915. 

It relies upon lovers of the Bible for that 
support which it urgently needs. 

Gifts for the Society’s work may be sent 
to the Agent in Seoul, Mr. Hugh Miller, or 
to the Secretaries, 

146 Queen Victoria Street 
LONDON.